Paul Wallach — Yielding Place

Exhibition

Installation, painting

Paul Wallach
Yielding Place

Ends in about 1 month: September 7 → November 2, 2021

We are pleased to present a new solo exhibition by Paul Wallach, who has been represented by the gallery since 2008. This exhibition, entitled Yielding Place, is a continuation of the artist’s three previous solo exhibitions in the gallery and exhibitions of his work in European and American institutions.

This new exhibition brings together a selection of recent works made in the light—and shadow—of the world events that have taken place since the pandemic began in 2020. The artist was deeply affected by this turmoil in his private life and existentially, and as an American citizen was also troubled by the situation in his native country, especially in the spring of 2020. Although color has at times sparingly appeared in his art, he felt compelled in these new works, which were born in the heart of chaos, to call upon white, with its limitless nuances. A return to the Essence, to Space, to Silence. An originary Simplicity. Recollection, renaissance.

“Ever-broader considerations of ephemerality, necessity, precariousness, utility, truth, ambiguity, time, light, place, space, form, material, vo- lume, emptiness, autonomy, identity, lightness, levitation, and gravity are endlessly combined, propagating questions that are the genesis of what will become sculpture. By sensing that each element makes the other necessary, I may come close to something worth pursuing, despite the fact that what is necessary must be perpetually redefined. My leaving New York for Düsseldorf in 1992 was a deliberate act. Living and working in Paris since 1994 continues to redefine necessity. Notebooks accumulated in my studio over time are filled with words, thoughts, titles, annotated sentences, punctuation marks, but rarely sketches. Drawings appear in space in three dimensions, in the materials I have at hand. These drawings are the starting point for the sculpture to come. The sculpture must conserve the immediacy of the drawing and at the same time make us forget its origins, in a necessary relationship between control and circumstances beyond my control.”

Paul Wallach